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a group of political science students from san jose state who watched the debate together last night downtown. after it was all over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room, yeah, they had to admit, romney gets the slight edge. >> overall, romney from my perspective did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> a political science professor from san jose state telling us, she thinks romney will get a nice bump in the polls from that debate. she adds whether that bumps come in the all-important swing states where the race is still very tight that, remains to be seen. >>> here's a question, historically how much impact do presidential debates have on an election when it's all said and done? we asked that question to a professor of political science at santa clara university. >> that's a good question. in 2004, john kerry won the first debate against president bush. and in 1984, reagan stumbled in the first debate against mondale and it didn't seem to hurt them very much. it will be interesting to see as the polls c
. ">>>politcal science honor society pi sigma alpha welcomed members, alumni, professors and students to the hilton hotel in downtown san jose to watch and discuss the presidential debate. society president sol jobrack was happy to see the large turnout. sol "they kind of like their candidates and hopefully this event can swing them either way." vice president ryan brewer saw this debate as a pivotal point for mitt romney and wants to see the republican take the oval office this fall. brewer "if you look at history, no president has ever won reelection with unemployment over 7.4%. today we are over eight, and i think that speaks a lot to people like me, a student thats going to be graduating in the future. i want to see someone who is good for the economy and good for my wallet." former pi sigma alpha president donna spencer is confident in president obama's plan. she thinks he is deserving of the second term in office and was excited to see the president defeat the opposition. donna "i'm here to watch the first presidential debate because i think its important that we're able to watc
of political science students. the president's own staff tonight said romney won the debate when it came to style points gop the students there agree? >> for the most part, yes, they do agree. about 120 political sciences students came here to watch the debate along with some professors and some alumni. the general consensus was romney had a slight edge over the president in terms of his performance at the debate tonight. >> two rebuild america. >> more effective. more charismatic. >> i will lower taxes on middle income families. >> governor romney held his own. actually, i was surprised. >> reporter: after the debate was over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room felt that romney had won. >> romney did a great job in presenting himself in like a very positive way. even though, like, the answers that obama gave were very pro democratic, pro public education. >> overall, romney, from my perspective, did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> this way it's his do or die moment. >> reporter: melinda jackson says ro
could have a profound affect on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the b
on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the beating cells they began watch
signed the bill and said, quote, these have no basis in science or medicine. they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery. >> an oakland man is one of 23 winners so called genius grants and is a family independence initiative after a challenge from mayor jerry brown taking a different approach to help poor families instead of giving aid it helps them figure out their own paths towards self sufficient. >> we're looking at character loans so that if you don't meet other criteria, there are other criteria you can access low interest loan autos the family independence initiative helped about 800 families and he plans to use a portion of the $500,000 money to expand the program to other country autos coming up next, there is a big new layoff announcement from silicon valley. hundreds of people about to lose their job autos stage is set tonight for first presidential debate. and voting against underway. >> there is a progress report on the new bay bridge. the lock is run to opening day. stay with us. >>> good evening, there is a packed house tonight. emotions are really on edge. abc
place winner of the broad come master's science competition in washington dc. she will take home $6,000 for her project on eye muscles and vision. santa clara brothers were two of the top 30 finalists in that competition. they studied star brightness using a digital camera and a telescope. >>> well, oote his chance for a vacation destination. his vision to turn one hawaiian island into a sort of peach. rosemary orozco will tell us how much cooler it's going to be trm ing to be tomorrow vo: for years, sacramento politicians have chopped away funds for our schools. today, we're forty-seventh out of fifty in per-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. on their own are amazing, but press out some biscuit dough, add some sauce and some pepperoni and cheese
and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> google and a group of publishers announced a settlement over diggal copyrights. they scanned -- digital cop rights. they said it -- copyrights. they said they will get to choose which books are included. >>> san francisco authorities apprehended a man who jumped bail after a guilty verdict in a scam. jay shah disappeared last month and was arrested yesterday. he is one of five charged with draining the equity out of three condos by creating flaweddially ownership -- fraudulent ownership documents. >>> it is called called the greed bus. why it rolled into the bay area and who it is targeting in the election. >> and a link between three cups of coffee or more a day and a condition that could effect your eyes. ñçbÑ >>> a political movement called stop the greed bus tour came to oakland today, they respect to get the greed out of politics and targeting the billionaire coke brothers. proposition 32, the measure on the ballot that would ban contributions to political candidates. >> how dare the coke brothers come into my communit
. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overuse that word. >> you can't overuse it too much. >> and hug, too. >> o
been a strong category. and it continues to be. the sciences are strong. >> any negative implications from these numbers? >> the negative would be the part-time work. it's going to come back to this part-time work number. if you're working part time and that job for example, goes away or alternatively you're getting paid less than what you really need to survive, then obviously people are going to not be able to spend and be part of the economy like we want them. but another big part of the numbers is the 3.5 million job openings that do exist in this country. every time i speak to business leaders, they tell me one of the biggest issues facing the economy going forward is the skills gap that we see. there aren't enough people studying science engineering in this country to fill those jobs. >> stay with us rebecca. >>> we want to go now to nancy cordes at the white house with a question of how this is playing on the campaign trail. nancy, good morning. >> good morning to you charlie. the obama campaign and aides here at the white house will be thrilled by this numb
. >> reporter: but u.s. political science professor cook says the romney campaign has been playing the expectations game both ways. >> coming out the conventions until now. certainly for the romney campaign hasn't been positive and they made the argument, wait until the debates come around. >> reporter: cook says romney has an advantage by simply appearing on stage with a sitting president. and romney could take advantage as the debate makes it to the economy. voters will have their chance to decide with two more presidential debates to follow this month. in san francisco, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and you can watch that debate live right here on ktvu channel 2 this wednesday. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. followed by a special edition of ktvu news. >>> a new analysis shows a record 23.7 million latinos will be eligible to vote in the upcoming election. that is more than 20% from 2008. the hispanic research says that the turn out is usually smaller than that of whites and african americans about 50%. that could be because eligible latino voters are younger and fewe
.s. political science professor cook says the romney campaign has been playing the expectations game both ways. >> coming out the conventions until now. certainly for the romney campaign hasn't been positive and they made the argument, wait until the debates come around. >> reporter: cook says romney has an advantage by simply appearing on stage with a sitting president. and romney could take advantage as the debate makes it to the economy. voters will have their chance to decide with two more presidential debates to follow this month. in san francisco, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and you can watch that debate live right here on ktvu channel 2 this wednesday. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. followed by a special edition of ktvu news. >>> a new analysis shows a record 23.7 million latinos will be eligible to vote in the upcoming election. that is more than 20% from 2008. the hispanic research says that the turn out is usually smaller than that of whites and african americans about 50%. that could be because eligible latino voters are younger and fewer younger people vote. >>> and i
schoolers to pursue science and engineering using only digital cameras and telescopes, they studied the brightens of stars and how it varies over times. >> one of the many types when an amateur astronomer can help the scientific community more than a professional can. >>> - - >> they find out tonight if they win. >>> complaints about a notorious foreclosure process are already dropping as the nation's landmark settlement is just about to go in effect. the deals between states and the largest lenders starts tomorrow. complaints about dual tracking dropped by 50% last month. that's when banks begin foreclosure proceedings at the same time as they're working on loan modifications. that practice is restricted under this new settlement. >>> we are following development news in hayward coming up in two minutes the new detail we're uncovering about a serious shooting just moments after officers arrive. >>> this couple dedicated they're lives to feeding the homes. but now they're ready to step aside and the question is, who's going to take over their job? mother nature's cool like that. mo
puts the technology in the hands of women themselves. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulne
in their food. so are we. we want to provide fact-based information to consumers that have some basis in science. but even the proponents of prop 37 agree that would be putting skull and cross bones on the label. that's when the founder of the proposition says. scientists agree that genetically en neared food are safe. even the american medical association voted to say that there is no concern. >> but the concern is that there is not enough research being done, things like allergens and what not. these products have been around for a couple of decades about but maybe that's not enough. >> there have been studies done, more than 400 studies done. and as you pointed out, they have been in the food supply for decades. we have eaten trillions and trillions pound of genetically engineered food. this is about prop 37. don't believe me, but the overwhelming majority of editorial boards in california have urged voters to reject it. >> okay. we are talking a lot about labeling. >> right. >> you said you had other concerns. you said out of the gate that this was not just about labeling. what are the other
are safe, they have been endorsed by the national academy of sciences, the world health organization and the american medical association voted at the annual meeting three months ago in june that there is no special labeling needed for bioengineering food. >> a lot of concern is that there is not enough research that has been done. things like allergens and whatnot. the products have been around a couple of decades but maybe that is not enough to know long- term effects. >> there have been studies done, more than 400 studies and they have been in the food supply for 20-plus years and we have eaten trillions and trillions of servings. there has been no scientifically based problems with this food. and really, you know, this is more than just a debate about genetically engineered food. this is about proposition 37. about a measure on the ballot on november 6th and people who have looked at it not just our campaign, don't believe me, but the overwhelming majority of editorial boards in california have urged the voters to reject that. >> okay, we are talking a lot about labeling. >> yeah
the technology in the hands of women themselves. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulnerable to contract
that this was discovered in 1923 beef published his findings on the online publication of science journal. he saw this first as a graduate student and this creature was about the weight of a house cat. about 1 million, 2 million years ago. the paleontologist describes is as somewhat of a bird. perhaps with a vampire characteristic. it is pretty unusual. we will take a quick break. we will be back with more toward this live look toward westbound looking decent. >> welcome back. contra costa are saying that more birds have tested positive for west nile. this recent heat wave is causing the spread. and residents should be taking preventative measures. so they do not be infected. the ctc saying that these six birds and a chicken were found in brentwood. pleasantville, walnut creek. that chicken was found avgroup in oakland. and make sure to not touch any of dead birds. they could usually be infected. >> a politica--this man is being held possibly shooting his neighbors between vallejo. and they were found dead in their front yard. this was a 45 minute standoff between police. this was the 17th/18th h
death in 20 years. our health and science editor john fowler tells us why it's an international first for an american and what it means for bay area residents. >> reporter: it happened somewhere in south contra costa county, where freeway overpasses offer ideal homes for colonies of mexican free tail bats. the species linked to this case of rabies. >> once the symptoms develop, it's universally fatal. >> after a bite or exposure to wild animal, the incubation phase is two to six months. >> reporter: health officials say the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat, quote, flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the gentleman who died of rabies went over and stuck his hand in the plastic bag and most likely was bitten. >> reporter: said to be a bay bridge contractor, he never reported the bite in march, took civilian work in iraq, and became infectious. the cdc says he flew home to contra costa county june 14th. four days later, san francisco to bangkok for two weeks vacation, had close contact with two people, flew back to
. the delivery system puts the technology in the hands of women themselves. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with - every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condemns. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more v
. and then for these, these are the breakthrough awards, these are based fully on science, innovation, products that have done something that no other product has done before. and we actually work it out with te dermatologists and chemists. we make sure these are legit. >> they've been scientifically tested and approved. >> completely. >> let's take a look at, starting first with the real weightless foundation from georgio armani, apparently five different oils instead of water or powder. >> and you know how foundation can feel thick and heavy, this one uses all the different oils which you think would be greasy, but they're really light oils, they evaporate on the skin, so you get the pure pigment. it's maestro foundation. >> amazing. >> those who suffer from r rosasia, there is no medical cure for this, but you did find this cream can be helpful. >> there's no cream over the counter for this. and what happens is there's too many blood cells underneath the surface of the skin and too reactive. so this aven cream, it's french. >> anti-redness. >> right. >> for chronic redness. it has a protein
is helpful to you in any way? >> there's a lot of emerging science. there's a percentage of americans that are trying gluten free to help them feel better, to help them achieve personal goals and you know, we hope that gluten free helps them get to where they want to go. >> it is a fad. there's no doubt the market research data shows that it's a fad. it's a $4.9 billion business. >> elizabeth sloan is one of the corrupt's leading experts on trends in the food industry. >> people believe that if they go do a gluten free diet, it's going to make them lose weight. there is no scientific evidence to show that's the case. >> everybody's doing it, everybody's talking about it, but it doesn't mean that it's good for everybody. >> dr. mark high man is the founder of the ultra medical center. >> is gluten healthy? >> gluten is not either healthy or unhealthy. it depends on whether your body is rejecting it. >> there's this sort of general feeling among people who don't know too much about it that giving up gluten is probably a good idea because it's going to make me healthier, true. >> if a fo
. harder, go for it. bash it around. there's no science to this. that's beautiful. toss them in. okay. >> what's in here? >> toss it in here. mortar style, old school. >> cave man. >> cave man cuisine art. >> this weighs a ton. >> that goes right in. you got it. there you go. we're going to add some oil. now the one thing about this, guys, you need to cut them chunky or else they are not going to get crispy. >> we like them chunky. >> hoda likes her men that way too. >> i'm in her ball league. >> that's another story. if you don't have a mortar at home -- >> who does? i don't know one person who has one of these, i put a plant in that. >> on top, we're putting them in for about 450 degrees, 25 minutes. don't even think about them. >> smell them burning. >> a little charred is a good thing. we're going to make a dressing with tahini. >> i like tahini. >> what is it in everyone knows? >> hummus, give me some. >> i thought it was an island in the pacific. >> it's made out of sesame seeds. peanut butter but with sesame seeds. we're going to make a dressing. you're whisking, you're pouring
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23